On-Demand Microtransit for Better Transit Station and Job Accessibility

The purpose of this research is to examine on-demand microtransit as a means of connecting the first-last mile segments of travel by public transit in low-density areas. We also examine the extent to which reduced travel times of first-last miles by on-demand microtransit influence low-wage job accessibility. As a case study, we compare the job accessibility outcomes across various modes of the first-last mile transit access and egress (walking, bicycle, car, and on-demand microtransit).

Union Rides: Harnessing the Shared Value of Commute Travel

Founded in 1979, Union Cab operates the largest taxi fleet in Madison, WI. Our vision is to develop a shared ride service within Union Cab—Union Rides—that will reach and serve the diverse group of non-drivers and zero-car households in the region by collaborating directly with employers, workers, and community organizations. These stakeholders will use discussion and negotiation to develop and implement an affordable, flexible, demand-responsive transportation service that connects workers to jobs that are not readily accessible to them.

Assessing Viability of Carsharing for Low-Income Communities

With the increasing benefits of car-share programs, it is important to understand how individuals characterize each service as well as their familiarity with the availability of programs in their locations. This information could be used to target services more effectively to those who already show evidence of adopting this form of transit, as well as more effectively reaching groups whom we would expect to benefit such as individuals who lack economic resources to own their own cars, but who need on-demand, door-to-door transportation.

Integrating Transportation Management Companies (TMCs) and Public Transportation

The rise of Transportation Management Companies (TMCs) like Uber and Lyft has disrupted and transformed the field of urban transportation. With near-ubiquitous access to a largely safe, comfortable, and reliable mode of transport, commuters and travelers are altering their transportation habits in unprecedented ways. As TMCs continue to grow in significance, the role of public transportation will unavoidably change in response.

Assisting New Transit Riders, Including those with Disabilities, via an App Designed for All

Planning and riding public transportation can be particularly daunting for new transit riders, especially those with intellectual disabilities. Transit agencies are also challenged with balancing the demand for paratransit services and its rising costs. Additionally, paratransit can be limiting to riders – advance registration of 24 hours or more is often required to book trips and there are often long waiting times. Riders receiving travel training to use fixed-route transit gain the freedom to travel more frequently, attend job interviews and work, and become more involved in the community.

Overcoming Local Barriers to Regional Transportation: Understanding Transit System Fragmentation from an Institutionalist Framework

While the federal government spends billions on transit projects each year, many regions have poor coordination of services, with some regions having over 21 transit agencies failing to offer integrated schedules, fares and services, while other regions have large swaths that are completely unserved. Many of these inefficiencies are not due to a lack of technology or funding, but to failing of the local funding and governmental structure.