Evaluation of Cost-Effective Alternative Designs for Rural Expressway Intersections

High-speed expressways functionally operate like freeways but have at-grade intersections that provide critical access to communities via minor roadways. These intersections provide key economic entry points to jobs and economic development and serve as lifelines for rural communities. They also provide ingress and egress for emergency vehicles and serve as evacuation routes in cases of natural disaster. As planning, design, operational and/or safety concerns arise at these at-grade intersections a typical response from concerned agencies can include either closure of such intersections leading to inequitable adverse economic and other impacts on the surrounding communities, install warning signs, or explore the construction of high-cost grade-separated interchanges.

Making Tolling Transparent: Analyzing Processes Used to Allocate & Distribute Toll Highway Revenue in Multiple States

Transportation finance has become increasingly unreliable in recent years, due to the declining revenue available from the motor fuel tax, increasing auto efficiency, and political reluctance to raise taxes. In many states, this has led to deferred maintenance, poor road quality, and failure to satisfy demand for better infrastructure. Some states have relied on toll revenue and other user fees to overcome these revenue challenges.

Strategic Investment Decisions on Highway Improvement Projects

Setting priority in highway improvement projects where safety consideration plays a differentiating role in the decision making process. As such, quantitative safety is now being recognized as an important element in the project selections process at the planning phase. Quantitative evaluation of safety performance of particular roadway facilities, for example, segments and intersections, is critical to understand where the safety concerns need to be addressed on a priority basis. Moreover, it is also important to implement appropriate safety improvements to prioritized set of locations where promise of safety benefits is potentially high.

Development of a Real-time Roadway Debris Hazard Spotting Tool Using Connected Vehicle Data to Enhance Roadway Safety and System Efficiency

Roadway debris and other unexpected obstructions, such as surface damage, or lane hydroplaning due to weather conditions like snow or precipitation, can lead to significant traffic delays or worse, crashes. The presence of roadway debris is particularly concerning in high-traffic and high-speed roadways where dense traffic conditions reduce visibility and large volumes of vehicles are exposed to risk. Although prevention of the various causes of obstructions and defensive driving can reduce these consequences, the problem cannot be eliminated entirely.

Creative Utilization of Urban Roadway Facilities with Predictive Safety Assessment Tool – Phase 1

The impact of predictive safety assessment based on quantitative methodology of the Highway Safety Manual (HSM) is significant particularly in urban roadway facilities. The responsibilities of safety professionals, transportation planners, and decision makers are critical for safe and efficient transportation in the ever-increasing travel demand in urban areas. The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative safety assessment tool of converting one urban roadway facility type to another with the application of predictive methodology and principles in the HSM.

Evaluation of Adaptive Ramp Metering on I80 in The San Francisco Bay Area

I-80 is the first corridor in the Bay area to have Adaptive Ramp Metering capability. This CTEDD (Center for Transportation Equity Decisions and Dollars) supported research analyzes highway performance data from I-80 corridor along with user perception of the new capabilities to provide lessons to ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) planners, engineering practitioners, and policy-makers on future implementation of Adaptive ramp metering (ARM) in the Bay area.

Fast Reference‐free Crack Measurement (RACM) System in Transportation Infrastructures using Noncontact Ultrasound

The research objectives of this project are the maintenance of transportation infrastructure: i) to develop and improve the reference-free crack measurement (RACM) hardware system for field applications, ii) to develop a post-processing diagnostic framework, iii) to develop monitoring system based on internet of things. In the research category, the reference-free crack measurement system is an innovative technique to improve system efficiency and better maintenance of existing infrastructure.

Evaluation of Pavement Performance Using Remote Sensing Techniques

Annually, transportation agencies spend several millions of dollars of expenditures for their rehabilitation works due to the problematic soils underneath the infrastructure assets. The soils in Dallas-Fort Worth region have high tendency to undergo swell-shrink behavior that contributes to the premature failure of pavements. The proposed research focused on conducting the laboratory tests on the field collected samples and validating their field performance using innovative data collection technologies.