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More Freight Vehicle Crashes on City Streets in Residential Areas: Why and to What Extent? A Case Study in Dallas-Fort Worth, TX



Project Details
Author(s) Sanggyun Kang, University of Texas at Arlington
Co-Author(s) Muhammad Arif Khan, Univeristy of Texas at Arlington
CTEDD Funding Year University-Industry Partnership Project
Project Status Complete

SummarySummary

Over the last decade, globalized supply chains, restructured logistics and freight transportation practices, and exploding online shopping have influenced how goods are produced, transported, stored, and sold. All these changes have resulted in substantial shifts in the spatial distribution of freight activity, as well as vehicles crashes that involved at least one freight vehicle freight vehicle crash . As a case study, we examine the correlation between development patterns and freight vehicle crashes on city streets in Dallas-Fort Worth DFW , TX. The DFW region is one of the largest metro areas, of which population has been growing most extensively over the last decade in the US. We use the freight landscape framework and test the extent to which the proxies for freight supply and demand explain the spatial and temporal variation in freight vehicle crashes, controlling for freight activity levels. We examine two models, 2016 cross-section and 2010-2016 time-series, using the crash records from the TXDOT Crash Records Information System. We test six models in terms of two crash severity levels all crashes and ...the crashes with a fatality or injury and three vehicle types all vehicles, vans, and trucks . The unit of analysis is a one-square-mile urban hexagon N 2,262 . As proxies for freight demand, we use population and freight-intensive-sector employment densities, median household income, and relative industry sector diversity. As proxies for freight supply, we use distance to the nearest airport, intermodal terminal, and highway ramp. Results show that the elasticity between population density and freight vehicle crashes is the largest, followed by freight intensive sector density. Results also suggest that freight-oriented activity alone may not sufficiently increase the likelihood of freight vehicle crashes. Rather, it may be the conflict between freight- and non-freight-oriented traffic or the conflict among various travel purposes originating from residence, service sector, and Read more



problem
Problem Statement

Over the last decade, globalized supply chains, restructured logistics and freight transportation practices, and a boom in online shopping have influenced how goods are produced, transported, stored, and sold around the world. These changes have together resulted in substantial shifts in the spatial distribution of freight activity, while also contributing to a rise in vehicle crashes involving least one freight vehicle. The intersection of these two trends poses significant questions for practitioners and scholars, as they must work to serve an increasingly mobile and time-sensitive freight environment while also aiming to reduce serious vehicle collisions on shared roadways. Because freight traffic is often concentrated in specific zones and corridors, and often heaviest at specific times of day and night, an examination of collisions must incorporate elements of both geography and time analysis. As a case study, we examine the spatial and temporal distribution of freight vehicle crashes on city streets ...in the Dallas-Fort Worth DFW Metroplex of TX. The DFW region is one of the largest American metro areas, with intensive growth in population and businesses over the last decade. This makes it an ideal setting in which to study the interactions between commercial Read more

Findings

Results show that the elasticity between population density and freight vehicle crashes is the largest, followed by freight intensive sector density. Results also suggest that freight-oriented activity alone may not sufficiently increase the likelihood of freight vehicle crashes. Rather, it may be the conflict between freight- and non-freight-oriented traffic or the conflict among various travel purposes originating from residence, service sector, and freight transport sector land uses.



findings


impact
Impact

This research and its findings are of critical importance to researchers, practitioners, freight companies, and policymakers. Results show the distribution of freight vehicle crashes is not spatially uniform, but clustered in specific locations. This provides evidence of collision hot spots that may require supplemental planning or collision mitigation infrastructure. Also, the increase in the frequency of freight vehicles generally occurred in specific locations, illustrating the continued growth of freight hubs and corridors focused in specific areas of the DFW Metroplex. Geographic hot spots encompassing both a higher frequency of freight vehicle crashes as well as rapid increases in freight vehicle crashes include downtown Dallas, Richardson, Carrollton, Plano, and various parts of downtown Fort Worth. It is imperative that policymakers implement various measures to mitigate vehicle ..crashes and improve road safety in those areas. Moreover, results show further research is necessary to improve the explanatory power of time-series models. Despite the clarity of results from this project, no concrete evidence is available for the factors that explain the changes in Read more

Downloadable Documents


Subjects#: Development Patterns, Fixed Effects Panel Model, Negative Binomial Model, Traffic Safety, Truck-involved Crash